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Friday, November 27, 2020 | History

2 edition of socio-economic impact of non-renewable resource development on the inuit of Northern Canada found in the catalog.

socio-economic impact of non-renewable resource development on the inuit of Northern Canada

Donald Mann

socio-economic impact of non-renewable resource development on the inuit of Northern Canada

  • 157 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published by University of Western Ontario, University of Waterloo in [London, Ont.], [Waterloo, Ont.] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Natural resources -- Economic aspects -- Northwest Territories, Canada,
  • Natural resources -- Social aspects -- Northwest Territories.,
  • Eskimos -- Northwest Territories -- Economic conditions,
  • Northwest Territories -- Economic conditions

  • Edition Notes

    Other titlesImpact of mining and hydroelectric projects and associated developments on Arctic renewable resources and the Inuit.
    StatementDonald Mann.
    SeriesRemewable Resources Project reports -- vol. 8
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsE99.E7 R411 8, F5918 M35
    The Physical Object
    Paginationiv, 94 p. :
    Number of Pages94
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18997242M

    Below you can find selected materials regarding issues of gender and equality in the Arctic region. The list is sorted by year of publication and is sortable and searchable. If you can contribute to these endeavours we would be very grateful. Please contact Embla at The Icelandic Arctic Cooperation Network regarding interesting material on gender and diversity in the Arctic. The Inuit people of northern Canada provide an example of a traditional economy. For thousands of years, Inuit parents have taught their children the survival skills needed to survive in the Arctic Circle's severe climate. Students will research the Inuit economy and compare and contrast it with the United States' market economy.   Applying the Community Well-being Index and the Human Development Index to Inuit in Canada - Aboriginal well-being: Canada's continuing challenge - () B. Birth outcomes in the Inuit-inhabited areas of Canada - Canadian Medical Association Journal, vol. , no. 2 () C.


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socio-economic impact of non-renewable resource development on the inuit of Northern Canada by Donald Mann Download PDF EPUB FB2

Arctic Indigenous people are communicating with resource development industries and governments to maintain a voice in the debate about how to develop and how it might impact community sustainability, culture and health (Nuttall ). Impacts of resource development are often explored through socio-economic measurements of.

A NEW APPROACH TO ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT IN NUNAVUT 8 parties must be active participants to ensure the achievement of the desired outcomes. This is explicitly stated in the Inuit Nunangat Declaration, with the Government of Canada and Inuit, “ committing to working in partnership to create socio-economic and cultural socio-economic impact of non-renewable resource development on the inuit of Northern Canada book.

The dominant assertion that socio-economic status in Northern communities improves with the introduction of resource development projects does not always bear out. Resources and Sustainable Development in the Arctic book.

Edited By Chris Southcott A review of frameworks, methodologies, and indicators for assessing socio-economic impacts of resource activity in the Arctic sustainability, and the environmental legacies of resource development in Northern Canada.

With Arn Keeling, John Sandlos, Jean Author: Chris Southcott, Frances Abele, David Natcher, Brenda Parlee. Inuit Circumpolar Council officials hope to create a cross-border collaboration that will draw strength from numbers but keep economic benefits of development in northern regions.

Northern Canada is endowed with abundant non-renewable natural resources, and exploration and development of those resources have increased steadily since World War II.

Social and Economic Development. Pauktuutit’s Socio-Economic Department has a mandate to cover a broad range of social and economic issues. Following the strategic direction from the Board of Directors, other work includes the areas of political equality and supporting women’s leadership, education, housing, early learning and child care, the protection and promotion of traditional knowledge, resource extraction, environmental issues, including climate change.

Resources and world development [This is a classic contemporary collection of contributions for the impact of economic development in the commodities supply and demand Jan   REUTERS/Euan Rocha.

Economic development in the Arctic is an ongoing challenge. People in the Arctic regions of Canada, Greenland and Alaska are mostly dependent on the government, the mining industry or oil and gas extraction for employment and generating income. But many are also involved in subsistence harvesting (hunting and gathering), which can sometimes be at odds.

Effects of socio-economic and cultural change: There is greater knowledge of the direct and indirect effects of Canada's residential school system on the mental health of succeeding generations of Aboriginal peoples (Wesley-Esquimaux, ; Truth and Reconciliation Commission. From Narrative to Evidence: Socio-Economic Impacts of Mining in Northern Canada.

This chapter, written by Thierry Rodon and Francis Lévesque, discusses the socio-economic impacts of mines in northern communities. It is published in the book Resources and Sustainable Development. Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada promotes environmental protection and ecological sustainability, and works with the Government of the Northwest Territories to implement innovative approaches for environmental stewardship and planning, while maintaining and strengthening partnerships with Aboriginal people and Northerners.

In northern and central British Columbia alone, major projects in mining, forestry and other industries are currently underway or under development. The vast majority of proposed resource development projects in Canada will affect lands and waters that are vital to the cultures and economies of First Nations, Inuit and Métis peoples.

MANN, D., –The Socio -Economic Impact of Non Renewable Resource Development on the Inuit of Northern Canada. Renewable Resources Studies, Waterloo, University of Western Ontario / University of Waterloo.

MININGWATCH CANADA, -«Mining in Remote Areas Issues and Impacts», MiningWatch Canada, Size: KB. Acknowledgments. This project was made possible by the financial and logistical assistance of numerous organizations, and we are grateful for their support: the Canada-Nunavut Geoscience Office, Natural Resources Canada, Indian and Northern Affairs Canada, Nunavut Tunngavik Incorporated, the Government of Nunavut, and the Polar Continental Shelf by: This paper examines the relationship between resource development and aboriginal community and cultural impacts in Canada's north from the s to the present.

For resource development in Northern Canada to be truly sustainable, it must occur in a manner that supports the cultural foundations of the Indigenous peoples of the region and enhances their ability to participate in economic and social affairs.

(In Press) Institutional Capacity and Resource Development: The Case of Canada’s Indigenous Peoples. Canadian Journal of Development Studies. Rodon, T. and Lévesque, F., Understanding the Social and Economic Impacts of Mining Development in Inuit Communities: Experiences with Past and Present Mines in Inuit Nunangat.

Northern Review, (41). A series of Supreme Court of Canada decisions has opened the door for Indigenous input into resource development decisions. Unlike the past, resource projects must pass the test of “Duty to Consult”, thus giving Indigenous peoples a powerful place at the decision-making table when resource development decisions are being made.

Second special Issue of the Northern Review on Research from the Resources and Sustainable Development in the Arctic – Issue #47 Dealing with Resource Development in Canada’s North Guest editor: Chris Southcott, Lakehead University Published: Introduction: Dealing with Resource Development in Canada’s North (Chris Southcott).

But this type of research is an ongoing and long-term commitment, with a great deal of prospective ground to cover. We urge the Government of Canada to extend the GEM program to another productive 5-year term. o Returning to the socio-economic impacts of resource development, the most basic consideration for Nunavut is local employment.

This region has great natural resource potential with energy, mining and infrastructure development being the largest private sector contributors to economies. Impacts, adaptations and mitigation needs to be discussed in the energy, mining and infrastructure sector by owners, operators, businesses, governments, utilities, academics, northern communities, and non-government organizations to assess climate change impacts.

The Nunavut Impact Review Board (NIRB), established under Articles 10 and 12 of the NLCA, is the IPG responsible for environmental assessment.

NIRB consists of nine members, including a Chair, nominated by the Government of Nunavut, the Government of Canada, and Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC). While, as Caulfield () notes, development of non-renewable resources such as oil and gas, gold, lead, zinc, and diamonds have had a profound impact on the livelihoods of Arctic peoples”, it is not just the fact of development that is important: rather it is the context within which exploration and resource development occurs which is crucial.

The history of Inuit relations with the Government of Canada has been a story of negotiation, accommodation and resistance. The relationship has developed around a long conversation of rights recognition and struggle for voice within the Canadian political system.

Inuit have made tremendous progress in this, and speak from a position of authority and strength on many issues of. This book examines the relationship between Arctic communities and extractive resource development.

With insights from leading thinkers in the field, the book examines this relationship to better understand what, if anything, can be done in order for the development of non-renewable resources to be of benefit to the long-term sustainability of.

Canada's Relationship with Inuit: A History of Policy and Program Development (continued) Aboriginal Communities and Non-Renewable Resources Development. Ottawa: National Roundtable on the Environment and the Economy, David G.

"Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation in Northern Canada, " Whitehorse: Northern Climate. The Canadian Northern Economic Development Agency (CanNor; French: l'Agence canadienne de développement économique du Nord) is a policy initiative announced by Prime Minister Stephen Harper of the Federal Conservative Party in August The purpose of the agency is to promote economic development and prosperity while protecting national sovereignty in Northern Canada.

This paper examines the relationship between resource development and aboriginal community and cultural impacts in Canada's north from the s to the present.

Based on a review of published literature, it is contended that northern centred Cited by: Examining What Successful Economic Development means in the Eyes of Inuit Living in Arctic Canada Primary Researchers: Kathryn Lupton. The circumpolar Arctic is predicted to garner investments ranging from $bn to bn over the next decade as climate change improves international shipping routes and accessibility to natural resources (Mikkola & Käpylä ).

Northern ‘capacity’ has long been identified as a priority area for public policy in Canada and recognized as a major constraint to regional social and economic : Peter J.

Usher. The history of the North in Canada has been shaped by changing boundaries, changing priorities, and the development of a national, northward-looking imagination. Canada First. The creation of the Dominion of Canada in caused some English Canadians to consider what attributes would define their new identity as : Kelly Black.

Economic Development from Renewable Energy 3 It costs between $2 and $5/Watt to develop a full hydroelectric generating system with annual energy output ranging from 40% to 70% of the peak output.7 The gen-erating price of small hydro facilities varies between $/kilowatt-hour (kWh) and $/kWh, depending on the capital costs and capacity.

IMPACTS OF MINING OPERATIONS ON ABORIGINAL COMMUNITIES IN THE NORTHWEST TERRITORIES AND LABRADOR: CASE STUDIES AND LITERATURE REVIEW ii RESCAN ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES LTD.

(PROJ#/REV A.1) JUNE Canada (Appendix 1), and provide a resource and reference list relating to Aboriginal communities and. Northern Canada is endowed with abundant non-renewable natural resources, and exploration and development of those resources have increased steadily since World War II.

Particularly during the past 20 years new regulatory controls have been emplaced in response to elevated concerns about the possible impact of resource development on the.

Blog. 13 May Stay connected to your students with Prezi Video, now in Microsoft Teams; 12 May Remote work tips, tools, and advice: Interview with Mandy Fransz. There are approximat residents in Nunavut living in 25 remote communities.

Nunavut covers a land mass of 1, km 2. It is the least populous and the largest in area of all of the provinces and territories of Canada. 84% of the population of Nunavut is Inuit.

A synthesis of the impacts of climate change on the First Nations and Inuit of Canada who rely more heavily upon natural resources for food, medicine, travel and utility in their daily lives 1 The First Nations and Inuit of northern Canada belong to social groups, which have a long history of.

Chris Southcott is the Principal Investigator for the Resources and Sustainable Development in the Arctic (ReSDA) research project as well as Theme Coordinator for the Sustainable Communities research work.

He is a Professor of Sociology at Lakehead University in Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada. Frances Abele is the ReSDA Theme Coordinator for the Sustainable Regions research and is a Professor.

The history and historiography of natural resource development in the Arctic: the state of the literature / Ken Coates --Social impacts of non-renewable resource development on indigenous communities in Alaska, Greenland, and Russia / Peter Schweitzer, Florian Stammler, Cecilie Ebsen, Aytalina Ivanova, and Irina Litvina --Northern.

Get this from a library! Resources and Sustainable Development in the Arctic. [Chris Southcott; Frances Abele; David Natcher; Brenda Parlee] -- Over the past thirty years we have witnessed a demand for resources such as minerals, oil, and gas, which is only set to increase.

This book examines the relationship between Arctic communities and.The Inuit (/ ˈ ɪ nj u ɪ t /; syllabics: ᐃᓄᐃᑦ, "the people", singular: Inuk ᐃᓄᒃ, dual: Inuuk ᐃᓅᒃ) are a group of culturally similar indigenous peoples inhabiting Inuit Nunangat, the Arctic regions of Greenland, Canada and Alaska.

The Inuit languages are part of the Eskimo–Aleut family. Inuit Sign Language is a critically endangered language isolate used in : 65, ().characteristics of Inuit communities in Canada often mirror those in developing nations (Table 1).

Communities are challenged by limited access to health services, low socio-economic status, high unemployment, crowded and poor-quality housing, concerns Table 1 Selected characteristics of Inuit regions of Canada. Inuit region Province/Territory.